The Modern Noahide Movement

Non-Jews living in observance of the Seven Noahide Laws.

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For many committed Noahides, that's the biggest challenge the movement faces. Once they've given up their prior religious lives, immersed themselves in Jewish learning, perhaps even succeeded in hooking up with a local Jewish community, many Noahides speak of a lingering hole, the lack of an active and defined spiritual and ritual life.

To fill the void--to transform this notion of Noahide law from a formless set of vague moral guidelines to a spiritually fulfilling lifestyle--Noahides have taken on themselves a host of what are known as "positive commandments," the rituals and religious activities that infuse traditional Jews' lives with structure, meaning, and spiritual foundation. These are not an inherent part of the Seven Mitzvot, but rather are voluntary observances to give their lives added spiritual meaning.

As a result, a committed Noahide lives a life of intense study of Jewish texts, not only on the Seven Laws themselves but also on all other aspects of a Jewish lifestyle, to discern which rituals a non-Jew may and may not perform. Theirs also is a life of prayer, which usually includes reading Psalms, composing original prayers, and reciting traditional Jewish liturgy, altered to remove or adapt all mentions of commandedness and chosenness, to make clear that it is only Jews, and not the Noahides, to whom those concepts apply.

Some hang a mezuzah on their doors, others don't feel it's appropriate. Ditto with tzitzit, the fringed undergarment worn by traditionally observant men. Shabbat looms large in the life of any traditional Jew, but all Noahides agree that they should not observe the Sabbath in the same strict way as Jews. Some focus on study and prayer, but don't avoid forbidden activities, like using electrical devices. Others observe Shabbat--at least occasionally--more parallel to the Orthodox way, but still make sure to do at least one activity over the course of the day that would be forbidden for Jews to do. Some will step outside and light a match, others will flip on a light switch, and others will write a check.

Many people are working to give structure and clarity to Noahide life. In other words, to give the movement its "there." Chabad and other rabbis, together with Noahides, are creating a Noahide siddur (prayer book) to standardize prayers, and a liturgy of lifecycle rituals, such as funerals and baby-naming ceremonies. Also in the works is a Noahide Shulhan Arukh, a comprehensive book of law pertaining to non-Jews, which will spell out specifically how Noahides should live, which mitzvot are acceptable for them, and which aren't. There are also numerous Noahide organizations popping up, aimed at uniting Noahides, providing support, and spreading their teachings.

The Conversion Question

So why don't Noahides just take that last step and convert? Nearly all Noahides have grappled with the conversion question, sometimes for years and sometimes without definitive conclusion.

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Michael Kress

Michael Kress is the executive editor of Parents.com. He was also the the VP of Editorial and Managing Editor at Beliefnet and the founding editor-in-chief of MyJewishLearning.com.