A New Model For Jewish Identity

Today, personal choice trumps group-oriented feelings of obligation as the basis for Jewish identity.

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Reprinted with permission from CLAL--the National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership.

For countless American Jews, Jewish identity is shaped by the model of living as a minority immigrant group struggling to protect its heritage against assimilation. Contemporary research affirms this, tending to frame questions in terms of traditional Jewish behavior--lighting Shabbat candles, attending synagogue, fasting on Yom Kippur, affiliating institutionally, and supporting Israel.

Yet the reality for many today is that they do not relate to this inherited model. Economically and socially successful insiders, Jews are part of a pluralist society in which the primary factor determining ethnic and religious identity is individual choice. We need a new, more helpful descriptive model that recognizes the vital role that personal decisions play in Jewish-American identity construction. I suggest a model based on the following four claims about contemporary Jewish identity:
who is a jew
First, Jewish identity is made up of choices. We pick, consciously or otherwise, from a sort of identity menu that offers us options for behaviors that we understand as "Jewish" because we see them as "Jewish things to do" or as "done in a Jewish way." At the cutting edge of cultural change, the menu expands, increasingly listing behaviors that once were seen as belonging to other, non-Jewish menus, such as donating to universities, museums, and symphonies.

Second, identifying ourselves as Jewish does not necessarily say anything about how we express that identity. From a purely descriptive standpoint, it is essentially the choice of self-identifying that makes us Jewish, even when it isn't exactly clear how that identity is experienced or conveyed.

Third, Jewish identity has become increasingly fluid and linked to personally important life contexts. For example, many Jewish parents find that their interest in Jewish life increases when their children reach school age. Or some, in late middle age, find that Jewish spirituality animates them. For those who have chosen more traditional Jewish identity behaviors--keeping kosher, going to synagogue, donating funds--this "shape shifting" may seem inauthentic, but for the vast majority of American Jews, being open to important lifecycle changes is more highly valued than faithfulness to traditional practice.

Fourth, most contemporary American Jews are suspicious of "experts" and rarely consult institutional authorities in choosing how to be Jewish. We resist any "pressure" to affiliate with Jewish institutions. If and when we choose to affiliate, it generally is not because we feel duty bound but because doing so meets our needs.

The model that I propose offers new approaches for supporting and enhancing American Jewish identity, given the realities of today. Whatever our particular ideas about how we would like to see Jewish identity develop, we will be better off if we accept the social and cultural realities of Jewish-American identity formation.

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Rabbi Tsvi Blanchard

Rabbi Tsvi Blanchard is the director of organizational development at CLAL-The National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership. He is the 2003 recipient of the Bernard Reisman Journal of Jewish Communal Service Article of the Year Award for "How to Think About Being Jewish in the 21st Century: A New Model of Jewish Identity Construction" (Fall 2002), on which this piece is based.