Jewish World Today 101

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Modern Jewish life is alive and buzzing with tradition and change. The number of Jews who adopt an observant, Orthodox Jewish lifestyle is on the rise. Meanwhile, participation in post-modern alternative Jewish activities like Jewish meditation and the new Jewish mysticism (neo-Kabbalah) is also increasing. Jewish life in the 21st century is, according to many observers, experiencing a renaissance.

The Jewish Family

The 21st-century Jewish family album would feature Jews that are Orthodox and secular, gay and straight, divorced and single, converts and non-Jewish family members, childless by choice and adopted. Modern Jewish families come in all shapes and sizes.

Contemporary Religious Issues

The search for a conscious community has characterized recent trends in Judaism. From the activities of the formal denominations--Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, and Reconstructionist--to those in more informal settings like feminist groups and havurot (Jewish fellowships), contemporary Jews are seeking a sense of spiritual connectedness. Jewish synagogues, philanthropic organizations and community centers agree that outreach is the key to building community and ensuring the continuity of the Jewish people. Jewish organizations disagree, however, on the extent and targets of outreach. Should it extend to interested non-Jews or just unaffiliated Jews? What about intermarried Jews? These questions get at the heart of the current debate regarding Judaism’s boundaries. Other questions on the contemporary horizon include: Can Orthodox women be rabbis? Should gay and lesbian Jews be rabbis? Parents? Marry same-sex partners? Are the children of an intermarried couple Jewish?  

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