Sukkot

sukkah

The Laws of Sukkah Construction

A sukkah must be large enough to contain a person's head, body, and table. The walls of the sukkah may be made of any material, but must be sturdy enough to withstand an ordinary wind. Sukkot begins at sunset on October 8th and lasts through the evening of October 15—try your hand at sukkah building this year!

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Basics

Sukkot 101

Sukkot 101

Brush up on the basics of this holiday in a hut.

In the Community

A major focus of public worship on Sukkot is the waving of the “four species.”

At Home

The theological and agricultural dimensions of the holiday converge in the symbolism of the sukkah.

Sukkot for Families

Creative tips for the happiest time of the year.

Lulav and Etrog

How to assemble and shake a lulav.

Food

Stuffed Pumpkin

Stuffed Pumpkin

A piping hot fall treat for Sukkot.

Stuffed Prunes

A delicious appetizer for your Sukkot meal.

Cranberry Coffee Braid

A wonderful fall dessert.

Sweet ‘n Spicy Sweet Potato Soup

A great soup to sip in the Sukkah.

Plum Cake

A German Jewish tradition.


Traditions & Rituals

The Sukkah

The Sukkah

A temporary dwelling.

Building a Sukkah

Instructions for the do-it-yourselfer.

Lulav and Etrog: Symbolism

There are many ways to explain what the four species represent.

The Ritual of Beating the Willow

How did this tradition develop?

Lulav and Etrog: Buying and Caring

What to look for, how to care for it and uses after Sukkot.

History

History

History

Sukkot is a seasonal agricultural holiday and one of the three pilgrimage festivals.

Biblical Sukkot

Observances are associated with the land.

Water-Drawing Festival

A Sukkot ritual from ancient times.

Rabbinic and Medieval Sukkot

Celebrating the land while in the Diaspora.

Sukkot in Modern Times

Some old customs have been revitalized.

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