My Jewish Learning

Tzedakah Quiz

Tzedakah, or righteousness, is often interpreted as charity, because Judaism views giving as the ultimate act of righteousness. As in most areas of life, here too Jewish tradition makes practical demands and specifies expectations. How much do you know about Tzedakah?



Question 1. Which of the following is not a loan regulation found in the Torah?
 A creditor was forbidden from seizing as collateral tools necessary for the debtor’s livelihood
 A garment pledged against a loan was to be returned for the night
 A creditor was forbidden to enter a debtor’s home to take a pledge
 Interest must be charged on loans of money and food

 

Question 2. What does a Jewish community traditionally have to provide for someone who becomes impoverished?
 Just enough to keep food on her table, clothes on her back, and a roof over her head
 Food, clothing, shelter, and education
 Whatever she was accustomed to before she became impoverished
 The average salary for someone in their city or town

 

Question 3. True of false: According to rabbinic law, one should give tzedakah to one's own near relatives who are poor before giving to the rest of her city's poor.
 True
 False

 

Question 4. Credit cooperatives that helped Jewish immigrants in the early 20th century were called
 Hebrew free loan societies
 Tzedakah banks
 Aktsiyes
 Hevurtas

 

Question 5. The corners of fields, which were designated for the poor, are called
 Tzedakah
 Pe'ah
 Pushke
 Ma'aser

 

Question 6. Which of the following is an example of tzedakah in biblical law?
 Lighting Shabbat candles
 Not eating pork
 Putting no other god before God
 Leaving the corners of one’s field unharvested

 

Question 7. The Book of Proverbs states that the doing of righteousness and justice is preferable to God than
 Observing the Sabbath
 The sacrificial offering
 The act of praying
 All other mitzvoth

 

Question 8. According to Jewish law, should one give money to a beggar on the street?
 Yes, but only if it’s clear that he is not intoxicated
 Yes, but only if he’s Jewish
 Yes, even if one’s own tzedakah fund has been depleted
 No, because giving a beggar money does not solve the greater problem

 

Question 9. Who composed the famous “Ladder of Tzedakah” which prioritizes the best forms of charity?
 Rashi
 Maimonides
 Nachmanides
 Rabbi Moses Feinstein

 

Question 10. The prohibition against humiliating a beggar comes from which Jewish text?
 The Torah
 The Talmud
 The Mishnah
 Proverbs