My Jewish Learning

Tzedakah Quiz

Tzedakah, or righteousness, is often interpreted as charity, because Judaism views giving as the ultimate act of righteousness. As in most areas of life, here too Jewish tradition makes practical demands and specifies expectations. How much do you know about Tzedakah?



Question 1. The prohibition against humiliating a beggar comes from which Jewish text?
 The Torah
 The Talmud
 The Mishnah
 Proverbs

 

Question 2. According to Maimonides' Ladder of Tzedakah, what is the lowest level of giving charity?
 One who gives anonymously
 One who gives less than what is fitting
 One who gives unwillingly
 One who gives before the poor asks for it

 

Question 3. Who composed the famous “Ladder of Tzedakah” which prioritizes the best forms of charity?
 Rashi
 Maimonides
 Nachmanides
 Rabbi Moses Feinstein

 

Question 4. True or false: The halakhah (Jewish law) regarding interest-free loans apply to Jews and non-Jews.
 True
 False

 

Question 5. True or false: Jews traditionally give tzedakah just before Shabbat and festivals.
 True
 False

 

Question 6. The rabbis of classical Judaism said tzedakah is
 Less important than other mitzvot
 Just as important as any other one mitzvah
 Equal in value to all other mitzvot combined
 Not important if you don't know any other mitzvot

 

Question 7. Credit cooperatives that helped Jewish immigrants in the early 20th century were called
 Hebrew free loan societies
 Tzedakah banks
 Aktsiyes
 Hevurtas

 

Question 8. The Book of Proverbs states that the doing of righteousness and justice is preferable to God than
 Observing the Sabbath
 The sacrificial offering
 The act of praying
 All other mitzvoth

 

Question 9. According to a rabbinic teaching, when a beggar stands before you asking for money
 You should ignore him
 You should cover your eyes
 You should know God's presence is with him
 You should know that God has abandoned him

 

Question 10. The call in Isaiah to "take the poor into your homes," read as the Haftarah on which holiday?
 Rosh Hashanah
 Yom Kippur
 Tisha B'av
 Sukkot