My Jewish Learning

Tzedakah Quiz

Tzedakah, or righteousness, is often interpreted as charity, because Judaism views giving as the ultimate act of righteousness. As in most areas of life, here too Jewish tradition makes practical demands and specifies expectations. How much do you know about Tzedakah?



Question 1. True or Fale: "What is mine is mine and what is yours is yours," is a good attitude toward wealth in Jewish tradition.
 True
 False

 

Question 2. The Book of Proverbs states that the doing of righteousness and justice is preferable to God than
 Observing the Sabbath
 The sacrificial offering
 The act of praying
 All other mitzvoth

 

Question 3. About the end of poverty, the Torah teaches
 “There will never cease to be needy ones in your land.”
 "There will be no poverty in the kingdom of David."
 "Poverty will end when sacrfice ends."
 "Poverty will decrease as learning increases."

 

Question 4. According to the Mishnah, how much of one’s fields must one leave unharvested for the needy?
 1/4
 1/18
 1/20
 There is no set amount

 

Question 5. Which of the following is an example of tzedakah in biblical law?
 Lighting Shabbat candles
 Not eating pork
 Putting no other god before God
 Leaving the corners of one’s field unharvested

 

Question 6. According to Jewish law, should one give money to a beggar on the street?
 Yes, but only if it’s clear that he is not intoxicated
 Yes, but only if he’s Jewish
 Yes, even if one’s own tzedakah fund has been depleted
 No, because giving a beggar money does not solve the greater problem

 

Question 7. According to the Talmud, which of the following is not a difference between charity and benevolence?
 Charity can only be carried out by giving money, whereas benevolence involves giving of one’s person
 Charity is directed to the poor, whereas benevolence involves the expression of goodwill to all
 Charity is given to the living, whereas benevolence can be extended to the dead
 Charity is not required of those who are less fortunate, whereas benevolence is required of everyone

 

Question 8. Tithing is known in Hebrew as
 Tzedakah
 Pe'ah
 Ma'aser
 Gemilut Hasadim

 

Question 9. According to the Torah, if a farmer or his workers missed a section of the field during harvesting
 He cannot go back and pick it
 He must go back and pick it
 He must go back and pick it and then bring it to the poor
 He must go back and pick it and store it up for the future

 

Question 10. Who is required to give tzedakah?
 Everyone, according to his or her means
 Only the breadwinner from every family
 Only families who never have to take tzedakah from others
 All who are greedy