Igniting Curiosity's Flame

It's important to encourage a child's natural ability and his or her own way of discovering the world.

Print this page Print this page

Reprinted with permission from Torah Topics for Today.

A child's face lighting up can light up the world. It most certainly will light up his or her parents’ hearts. Children are naturally curious, and their faces light up with understanding and delight. It's up to us as parents and teachers to keep encouraging and nurturing that curiosity. When children ask a question and you don't know the answer, look it up with them, or encourage them to look for the answer themselves. That is the beginning of education and using resources to follow one's own curiosity into deeper understanding.

This week's Torah portion describes the seven lamps that light up the sanctuary. The lamps can be seen as education, the way we light up the minds and hearts of our children. Education is not only a matter of school and academic learning. Children explore the world in all kinds of ways, with their bodies, their souls, their minds. It's important to encourage a child's natural ability and his or her own way of discovering the world.

We need to support the kind of education that nurtures a child's curiosity. Education is not only a matter of mastering bodies of information. It's about questioning and exploring, lifelong habits that will serve your child well. Our own Jewish sources illustrate traditions of questioning and responding to those questions over generations. Invite your children to join the Jewish conversation with their own questions and thoughts about things like God, the Jewish people, and what we practice ritually.

TALK TO YOUR KIDS about what questions they wish they could answer.

CONNECT TO THEIR LIVES:

· What are you most curious about?

· How do you go about finding out things? 

· What other ways might you find the answers you are looking for? 

· How does it feel to learn new interesting information?

Did you like this article?  MyJewishLearning is a not-for-profit organization.

Please consider making a donation today.

Rabbi Dianne Cohler-Esses

Dianne Cohler-Esses is the first Syrian Jewish woman to be ordained as a rabbi. She was ordained in 1995 at the Jewish Theological Seminary. She is currently a freelance educator and writer, teaching and writing about a wide range of Jewish subjects. She lives in New York City with her journalist husband and their three children.