Parashat Korah

Reflect Before You Respond

Moses' response to Korah's challenge teaches us to first reflect on our own actions in any situation of conflict or anger.

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I think this is a very psychologically provocative midrash. R. Shneur Zalman (also known as the Ba'al HaTanya after his most important book) challenges us to follow Moshe's example by first reflecting on our own actions in any situation of conflict or anger. In effect, this midrash says to us: even Moshe had to consider the possibility that Korah had a valid point, or at least that his accusations contained some kernel of truth.

In the rabbinic tradition, Moshe is the archetypal good man, and Korah the very symbol of selfishness and evil--so how much more are the rest of us, all the "in-between" people, challenged to consider the possibility that other's words may contain painful truths.

What's so brilliant about this midrash is that it refuses to provide any easy answers to human relationships. It would be too easy to say that any situation of conflict reflects equally badly on both parties, and thus slide into a kind of psychological relativism. Yes, sometimes people do bad things out of their own pain, but this way of seeing things gets people "off the hook" for their actions.

On the other hand, it would also be too easy to say that some people do evil or hurtful things simply because they are evil people--but this does not account for Judaism's insistence that all people, even Korah, are made in the Divine Image. Even Korah could have been the agent of holy truth. As it turned out, he wasn't, but there was no easy way, other than real soul-searching, to either "validate" Korah's feelings or write him off as an arrogant usurper.

According to the Ba'al HaTanya, some people may be bad, but we must always be open to hearing the truth from any source. Or, as Kolel's webmaster often says, we must "seek first to understand," before we react in a situation of conflict. Who knows--we might be in the presence of a "divider," or we might be in the presence of "messenger from On High."

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Rabbi Neal J. Loevinger

Rabbi Neal Joseph Loevinger is currently the rabbi of Temple Beth-El in Poughkeepsie, NY. A former student at Kolel, he served as Kolel's Director of Outreach from late 1999-2001. He was ordained in the first graduating class of the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies of the University of Judaism, and holds a Master's of Environmental Studies from York University in Toronto.