Teaching Ethics to Last a Lifetime

Va'et'hanan for families.

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Reprinted with permission from Torah Topics for Today.

Raising children is not only about teaching our children how to be successful in the future, going to the right schools and finding the right job. It's also about teaching them ethics that will carry them through their lives. The ethics we teach to our children are meant to last a lifetime and, in fact, to outlive us.  
 
Moses is told in this Torah portion that he will not be able to enter the Promised Land. But he is to teach the people of Israel a body of ethics to serve them in their building of a new society in the Promised Land. This body of ethics is meant to guide the people of Israel in their new lives and into the future, with each new generation.
va'et'hanan for families
We too, as parents, may not survive to witness our children or our grandchildren reach their "Promised Lands." However, the ethics we teach them now will last them through their lives. Whether it's honesty, or commitment, or kindness to one's neighbor, or giving to the poor, or gratitude, these ethics will travel the distance through our children's lives and hopefully even through our grandchildren's lives. While we our pressured now to raise children who are civilized and obedient, it's important to take the long view. We teach now, but we also teach ethics for the generations that will follow us.

TALK TO YOUR CHILDREN about how Moses instructed his people on ethics to guide their lives into the future. 

CONNECT TO THEIR LIVES:   

·    What does it mean to be good?
·    How should one treat others?
·    Which lessons are hardest to remember in your day-to-day life at school or at home? Which are the easiest to remember?

© Copyright 2010 Joyce and Fred Claar

Rabbi Dianne Cohler-Esses

Dianne Cohler-Esses is the first Syrian Jewish woman to be ordained as a rabbi. She was ordained in 1995 at the Jewish Theological Seminary. She is currently a freelance educator and writer, teaching and writing about a wide range of Jewish subjects. She lives in New York City with her journalist husband and their three children.